Science used to be classy

science history, class, and aesthetics

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Space Teriyaki 7

Visions of space and the future in Japan in the 70s and 80s

1Gan Hosoya, 1973, “Silence” poster

2. Tadami Yamada, c.1975

3. Genpei Akasegawa, c.1975

4. Hajime Sorayama, c.1975

5. Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

6. Hisashi Saito, 1983, catalog illustration

7. Kazuyuki Goto, c.1975

8. Sadao Sato, 1983, original work

(via karathraceisontop)

ibmblr:

The World’s Largest Telescope Made With Data

Look up on a starry night and consider this: in our lifetime we just might find the answers to one of life’s biggest mysteries, and we mean BIG. Dutch research institute, ASTRON and its international partners are building the world’s largest radio telescope, aka The Square Kilometer Array, to get a glimpse of the origins of the universe. This big telescope is made up of thousands of interconnected smaller telescopes, carefully arranged in fractal patterns to let us look back in time more than 13 billion years—to mere seconds after the universe was created. How on Earth is this possible? By processing exabytes of Big Data (That’s a 1, plus 18 zeroes) in real time. Or roughly 3X the amount of data running through the Internet per day. Amazingly, this will let scientists map out how the universe came to be. Imagine the look on Galileo’s face if he were here to see it.

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(via we-are-star-stuff)

entophiles:

A very pretty rove beetle that I found hiding in a package I opened outside. (Sept 2013)

astrodidact:

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.
Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via Wired, Science Alert/fb
Image: NASA

astrodidact:

Want to build your own space agency? Well, now you can, because NASA’s about to give away a whole bunch of their code for free! You’ll have access to the coding behind robots, cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.

Read more: http://wrd.cm/1i5Q3H9 via Wired, Science Alert/fb

Image: NASA

(via we-are-star-stuff)